13 Stolen Girls – Gil Reavill

3/5 stars.

Thanks to Random House Publishing Group – Alibi Alibi, via NetGalley, for an opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

I enjoyed this book, but it was hard to read in places, since it dealt with the BDSM scene in LA. Except the killer took it too far. The book trilogy that fostered the majority of the BDSM stuff in the book was very similar in description to today’s Shades of Gray series, except it was aimed at the 19-25 age bracket, rather than older.

Anyway. I liked Layla, but we heard very little about her personal life in this book. The only really personal bits that the reader ever hears about Layla in this book have to do with her dad, but even then, there aren’t a whole lot of very personal moments. Because of this, it was hard to feel as though I knew Layla, in any sense of the word.

Sure, we get to see her in the field a lot of the time — but as to what makes her tick, what made her feel like it was important enough for her to work on the Tarin Mistry case even after she was told not to? That confused me. We were told several times that it was because it felt important to her, and that she was putting that case together with a string of missing persons cases that were all similar in some way, but again, that’s about as personal as it gets. I want to know why it was important to her, why she always wanted to work alone (it felt like there had to be more to that than her just wanting to be solo, a woman in a historically male job), etc.

It was a pretty exciting read, though, despite the flaws pointed out. I would have finished it faster than I did (I think it took me 3-4 days?) but because of the BDSM stuff and the cruel manner in which it was used towards the murder victims, I had to take it slower.

Also, I totally did not foresee the ending. Very interesting, Mr Reavill, very interesting indeed…

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