A Cure for Madness – Jodi McIsaac

Thanks to Thomas & Mercer, via NetGalley, for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

5/5 stars.

Those of you who have been following my blog for awhile know that I love to dissect books about mental illness, especially when the author has done a terrible job at the research involved in the book (for examples, see this review of The Asylum Prophecies or this review of Switching Time).

There was none of that nonsense in A Cure for Madness.
(Can I tell you how much I adore authors who present a realistic picture of mental illness??)

Anyway. I think what really caught me up in A Cure for Madness was not so much the fact that there was a pathogen that created an extremely contagious and incurable disease that was very similar to schizophrenia… but was more the relationships. I loved seeing how Clare slowly realized that her brother, Wes, was right in a lot of what he said, regarding her running away from Clarkeston. I loved seeing her character growth throughout the novel. And I loved Wes’ brotherly jabs at her (“my friends aren’t dickheads… unlike yours”).

I would’ve liked to see more romance between her and Kenneth, but given the hectic and tense situations that they continuously faced, it makes sense why there wasn’t (and honestly, given the setting of this book, it would’ve been more of a distraction had there been more of a spark between them). That being said, the book ended on such an amazing cliffhanger-but-not-quite-cliffhanger so if there is a follow-up/sequel to A Cure for Madness, I definitely want to see more Clare-and-Kenneth interaction in there (even if it’s not super romantic).

My honest opinion – Jodi McIsaac has a lot of talent. And I’m very interested to see where she will go from here. I’m definitely going to be putting some of her others books on my TBR pile (which is about the size of Mt. Everest now… and growing!).

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Relentless – T.L. Childs & T. Deebs

Many thanks to SOURCEBOOKS Fire, via NetGalley, for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

4.5/5

I loved this book.

I didn’t read the first in the series (Powerless) but I think I’m going to – at some point – because I loved the world that Childs and Deebs created. A world where maybe the heroes aren’t all good, and maybe the villains aren’t all bad…

Kenna and her “gang” were very much enjoyable – hilarious, fun, and interesting – although I felt a little like I was missing some information since I hadn’t read the first book in the series. However, Relentless is standalone enough that I understood the majority of what was happening. That being said, for anyone who wants to read this, I’d recommend starting with Powerless for a smoother ride through Childs’ and Deebs’ world.

Nitro cracked me up.

I did get a little tired of Draven being “the bad boy” at the start, but then that illusion disappeared.

The ending was amazing, and I could totally see it playing out in my head like one of Marvel’s movies. (And that is a definite plus!) That being said, I’m not vying for this book to be the next YA made into a film, since I think that would do it an injustice. Though I do think that it would be a very interesting and enjoyable movie, I am more excited about the world and the action scenes being so vivid on paper alone.

I’m not sure what else I can say about this without spoiling elements of the story, but I do recommend it to those who want a rather different take on the hero/villain world. πŸ™‚ I whizzed through Relentless and even though I’m a fast reader, I’m pretty sure it would be a fairly speedy read for anyone.

Now I want to get my hands on Powerless… πŸ™‚

Surviving Haley – Brenda Baker

Thanks to Pelican Book Group, via NetGalley, for an opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review!

2/5 stars.

Well, there’s a list of pros and cons about this book. And although I zoomed through this, I have a feeling that the list of “things I hated” is going to be a lot longer than “things I liked/loved.”

The things I liked/loved
* The fact that this book dealt with (or attempted to deal with) the difficult topics of grief/loss and how blame gets “passed around.”
* The fact that the disordered eating portrayed in the book was overeating, rather than undereating. That’s pretty rare, at least in my experience, regarding protagonists with eating disorders (or disordered eating).
* The fact that the school psychologist, who was the person that really ended up helping Protagonist, was cool and off-beat. πŸ™‚

The things I disliked/hated
* Mean Girl was introduced, it was exposed that she had bulimia, but there was NO follow-up to that, and then suddenly, magically Mean Girl and her posse are being kind to Protagonist?
* Insta-insta-love. Jonah’s “God thing” was so humiliating, although he himself was and is adorable, and then BOOM…. all of a sudden after he shares that he’s not perfect, Protagonist loves him and he loves her, and they tell each other that…?
* Therapist (school psychologist) – who seemed REALLY cool, I loved that part – told Protagonist to friend her on Facebook “so they could chat”?? VERY SKETCHY ETHICS, YO. That’s not how therapy works…
* Introduction of Jazz and soccer and then again, surprise!!… NO FOLLOW-THROUGH. Granted, this is not a major part of the story, but I wanted to hear more about it!!
* Eli. Random guy who has a face full of pimples and ragged clothes, who is never anything but nice to Protagonist (and to whom Protagonist, who is herself an outcast, is mean and dismissive), is found by Protagonist in the art room cutting after having seen her and Jonah kissing…? and there is NO FOLLOW-THROUGH, once again.
* When the family moves to the new area, it’s only been TWO MONTHS since Haley died? How is that remotely logical?!! Two months after a child dies… I don’t know, but I’m pretty sure no family that I’ve ever met would be “put together” enough to move from Minnesota to Nebraska and have jobs lined up, etc. TWO MONTHS. Not two years. Not even a year. MERELY SIXTY (yes, 60) DAYS, and the family is up and moving. NOT REALISTIC.
* Mom goes into rehab, once she magically realizes that her drinking has become dangerous… bada-bada-BOOM… and once again, NO FOLLOW-THROUGH. And one month (ish?) into rehab, surprise honey, the family is going on a cruise BECAUSE WHY NOT?!

I guess a lot of magic happens in this book, because so many things justΒ magically get better.

It’s really irritating.

That being said, I can’t totally say this book isn’t worth reading. Baker has done a pretty amazing job of introducing overeating and the obsession regarding using food to soothe. It’s not something you see much, if at all, in YA, and I think it needs to be talked about/written about more because it is a problem, just as much as anorexic and bulimic behaviors.

Also, I liked the honesty of how parents (and people in general) can blame specific people (in this case, Protagonist) for the death of a loved one… Seeing how this was dealt with in the novel was interesting. Although again, I don’t buy how Mom and Protagonist “made up.”

I’ll also admit that this book yanked me in. It was very interesting and despite all of the things I disliked, it was what could be called “compulsively readable.” I am interested to see what else Ms. Baker comes out with, because I do think that there is talent there… there was just too much shoved into this book for it to completely work. But that’s a common error for debut novels, at least from what I’ve seen.