Relentless – T.L. Childs & T. Deebs

Many thanks to SOURCEBOOKS Fire, via NetGalley, for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

4.5/5

I loved this book.

I didn’t read the first in the series (Powerless) but I think I’m going to – at some point – because I loved the world that Childs and Deebs created. A world where maybe the heroes aren’t all good, and maybe the villains aren’t all bad…

Kenna and her “gang” were very much enjoyable – hilarious, fun, and interesting – although I felt a little like I was missing some information since I hadn’t read the first book in the series. However, Relentless is standalone enough that I understood the majority of what was happening. That being said, for anyone who wants to read this, I’d recommend starting with Powerless for a smoother ride through Childs’ and Deebs’ world.

Nitro cracked me up.

I did get a little tired of Draven being “the bad boy” at the start, but then that illusion disappeared.

The ending was amazing, and I could totally see it playing out in my head like one of Marvel’s movies. (And that is a definite plus!) That being said, I’m not vying for this book to be the next YA made into a film, since I think that would do it an injustice. Though I do think that it would be a very interesting and enjoyable movie, I am more excited about the world and the action scenes being so vivid on paper alone.

I’m not sure what else I can say about this without spoiling elements of the story, but I do recommend it to those who want a rather different take on the hero/villain world. πŸ™‚ I whizzed through Relentless and even though I’m a fast reader, I’m pretty sure it would be a fairly speedy read for anyone.

Now I want to get my hands on Powerless… πŸ™‚

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Surviving Haley – Brenda Baker

Thanks to Pelican Book Group, via NetGalley, for an opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review!

2/5 stars.

Well, there’s a list of pros and cons about this book. And although I zoomed through this, I have a feeling that the list of “things I hated” is going to be a lot longer than “things I liked/loved.”

The things I liked/loved
* The fact that this book dealt with (or attempted to deal with) the difficult topics of grief/loss and how blame gets “passed around.”
* The fact that the disordered eating portrayed in the book was overeating, rather than undereating. That’s pretty rare, at least in my experience, regarding protagonists with eating disorders (or disordered eating).
* The fact that the school psychologist, who was the person that really ended up helping Protagonist, was cool and off-beat. πŸ™‚

The things I disliked/hated
* Mean Girl was introduced, it was exposed that she had bulimia, but there was NO follow-up to that, and then suddenly, magically Mean Girl and her posse are being kind to Protagonist?
* Insta-insta-love. Jonah’s “God thing” was so humiliating, although he himself was and is adorable, and then BOOM…. all of a sudden after he shares that he’s not perfect, Protagonist loves him and he loves her, and they tell each other that…?
* Therapist (school psychologist) – who seemed REALLY cool, I loved that part – told Protagonist to friend her on Facebook “so they could chat”?? VERY SKETCHY ETHICS, YO. That’s not how therapy works…
* Introduction of Jazz and soccer and then again, surprise!!… NO FOLLOW-THROUGH. Granted, this is not a major part of the story, but I wanted to hear more about it!!
* Eli. Random guy who has a face full of pimples and ragged clothes, who is never anything but nice to Protagonist (and to whom Protagonist, who is herself an outcast, is mean and dismissive), is found by Protagonist in the art room cutting after having seen her and Jonah kissing…? and there is NO FOLLOW-THROUGH, once again.
* When the family moves to the new area, it’s only been TWO MONTHS since Haley died? How is that remotely logical?!! Two months after a child dies… I don’t know, but I’m pretty sure no family that I’ve ever met would be “put together” enough to move from Minnesota to Nebraska and have jobs lined up, etc. TWO MONTHS. Not two years. Not even a year. MERELY SIXTY (yes, 60) DAYS, and the family is up and moving. NOT REALISTIC.
* Mom goes into rehab, once she magically realizes that her drinking has become dangerous… bada-bada-BOOM… and once again, NO FOLLOW-THROUGH. And one month (ish?) into rehab, surprise honey, the family is going on a cruise BECAUSE WHY NOT?!

I guess a lot of magic happens in this book, because so many things justΒ magically get better.

It’s really irritating.

That being said, I can’t totally say this book isn’t worth reading. Baker has done a pretty amazing job of introducing overeating and the obsession regarding using food to soothe. It’s not something you see much, if at all, in YA, and I think it needs to be talked about/written about more because it is a problem, just as much as anorexic and bulimic behaviors.

Also, I liked the honesty of how parents (and people in general) can blame specific people (in this case, Protagonist) for the death of a loved one… Seeing how this was dealt with in the novel was interesting. Although again, I don’t buy how Mom and Protagonist “made up.”

I’ll also admit that this book yanked me in. It was very interesting and despite all of the things I disliked, it was what could be called “compulsively readable.” I am interested to see what else Ms. Baker comes out with, because I do think that there is talent there… there was just too much shoved into this book for it to completely work. But that’s a common error for debut novels, at least from what I’ve seen.

Haven – A.R. Ivanovich

Many thanks to Alloy Entertainment, via NetGalley, for letting me read this book in exchange for an honest review!

5/5 stars.

I’ll be honest. I’ve read a lot of lackluster YA fantasy in the past couple of years – not enough that my interest in the genre is burnt out, by any means, but there certainly seems to be a lot of reuse regarding world building, etc.

I found nothing in Haven that I would consider a trope.

I also found myself enjoying Haven far, far more than I thought I would.

Yes, our protagonist, Katelyn, can be a bit of a brat. Yes, there is instalove (although I didn’t really find myself getting annoyed by that, since there was a lot of other stuff going on throughout the book as well).

But the world was amazing. Many of the scenes – if not all – that took place outside of Rivermarch (and even some that took place there) were ones that I could easily envision, almost like I were watching them unfold on a TV screen. The characters, the places – everything, pretty much – came alive for me.

I don’t really have any complaints about this book, at least not that I can think of right now. If any do pop into my brain, I’ll definitely edit this and add them. But for me at least, this was one of the rare 5/5 stars as well as a book that I think I’d be happy rereading (which is generally what I mean by giving 5/5 stars to a book).

Definitely do recommend to any fantasy lovers, YA lovers, etc. πŸ™‚

Under the Dusty Moon – Suzanne Sutherland

Many thanks to Dundurn, via NetGalley, for an opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review!

2/5 stars

I hate writing bad reviews of books that had a lot of potential. But truth be told – this was a really disappointing book. By the time I read it, I’d forgotten what the basic synopsis was – so I read the first part of the blurb, and then dove into the book.

And – as has happened all too frequently in the past months – this book falls under the category of WTF did I just read? It wasn’t that the writing was awful, or that the characters were totally unbelievable (I loved Micky’s obnoxiously adorable mothering style, although it was a little over the top). I just am not quite sure what the point of the book was.

I think that the talent is definitely there to write a good book. And I think that if Sutherland did a rewrite, after seeing what reviewers have posted, she could probably turn out a better version of this story. I’m not saying that that’s remotely viable, but I’m also not trashing the author’s ability to write. There is potential in this book – it just felt to me like Under the Dusty Moon was put together too quickly, and not enough effort was made to ensure that there was a problem that needed to be addressed (i.e., formation of the plot), and that there were logical steps taken to solve that problem.

My biggest peeves were:
* Vic is whiny. End of story. Whining because she’s too hot, too sore, too lonely. Just whining. That’s all it feels like she does. I didn’t really like her. At all. Which – again – was a huge letdown.
* There was the “geek boyfriend” that wasn’t really thatgeeky (which was a huge let-down… based on what was shared in the book, I have NO idea why Vic liked this guy so much… nor do I have the slightest idea why his “round cheeks” were mentioned so many times… how is that “hot”? It makes me think of a baby-faced boy, not a hottie that “could get all the girls he wanted” – or something to that effect).
* Feminist gamers played way too small a part in this book. Wanted more! MORE!!!!
* Mentioning a “distant grandmother” in the blurb generally makes me think of a reconciliation or… something, anythingthat would solve the distance (or explain it!) between grandmother, mother, and granddaughter. But nope. Distant grandmother stayed distant.
* Best friend. After the first portion of the book, I was pretty sure that there was going to be a disclosure about best friend’s sexuality or… something, anything that would incorporate tension and stress and an actual problem into the story that needed to be solved, fixed, coped with, whatever. But nope.

Again – I think there’s potential for Sutherland to write a really good book. I think this book showed that because it had a lot of potentially good elements. Sadly, however, it did not live up to even my low expectations (low because I wasn’t sure what I should have been expecting from it, nothing to do with the author).

But it felt – also – like there were way, way, waaay too many different elements being packed into this book. Distant grandmother, mom going away on a tour (plus concerns about mom’s boyfriends), daughter left at home under grandmother’s charge, boyfriend that was kind of geeky but not really, best friend who didn’t really like boyfriend, elements of gaming/writing games for an all-female gamer group (that weren’t super realistic IMO), girl trying to figure out her place in the world with a world-famous mom (or Canadianfamous anyway)…..

Yeah. Just way too much crammed into a fairly short book. You could take any two or three of the above-mentioned things, and create a book from that alone by going more in-depth with the characterization and other elements of the story that were missing in Under the Dusty Moon, like relationships, tension/a problem that needs to be resolved, etc.

But despite my disappointment, I would read something by Sutherland again for sure. Even though this book felt like it had no purpose, the writing was interesting enough to keep me entertained. Not an “edge of your seat” book by any means, nor quite a “relaxing summer read,” but I did get through it without any cringing or complaining. And unlike the books that I absolutely cannot handle, I didn’t write out the things I hated and wanted to bring up in my review on index cards stashed around on my desk. πŸ™‚

These Vicious Masks – Tarun Shanker & Kelly Zekas

Many thanks to Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group, via Netgalley, for an opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review!

4.5/5 stars.

Okay, seriously. This book was amazing.

I didn’t read the blurb on Goodreads prior to reading the book (the blurb on Netgalley is entirely different). Had I read the GR blurb, I may have been a little less intrigued by the story – because really, Jane Austen meets X-men…?

But the heroines, Evelyn and Rose, are badass and awesome. They aren’t fainting flowers, and the romance in the book really… wasn’t that bad. In fact, comparing this to some of the other books I’ve read (or am currently reading), there was barely any romance in These Vicious Masks at all. So I guess that’s my way of saying – there was romance, but it definitely didn’t play a huge role, nor did it overpower the actual story.

I loved the characters. I loved the mixture of steampunk and fantasy. I loved the idea of having abilities that are not your normal “superhero abilities.” I loved Sebastian especially.

And the ending – oh my heart!!……

I’ll definitely be keeping this series on my radar… I WANT TO KNOW WHAT HAPPENS! That being said, These Vicious Masks didn’t quite end on a cliffhanger, so that made me happy. There are just some unresolved portions of the story but nothing “serious enough” to warrant me calling it a cliffhanger. But as I said – I definitely want to read the rest of the series.

And yes, I definitely do recommend this to anyone who loves steampunk, who loves romance in small doses, who loves kickass heroines…

(My only problem with this book is that I did get bogged down in it a little bit, at about 60%. However, I think that was more my own fault – I got too involved in reading a ton of books at once – rather than it being the fault of the writing style or anything else like that.)

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend – Katarina Bivald

Many thanks to Sourcebooks Landmark, via Netgalley, for an opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review!

4.5/5 stars.

Okay, in all honesty, I did get a little bogged down in The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend. For me, the bogging down occurred around 75% or so through the book. However, once I picked it back up and resumed reading, the story sped up after ~80%.

I. Loved. This. Story.

It’s a charming, quirky, adorable story about a spinster bookseller, Sara, who comes to America to visit a close friend (with whom she has been in contact via snailmail for a long time, but never met in person). And it’s a charming, quirky, adorable story about how the little town that Sara is visiting falls in love with her.

There were a few sections that were confusing or that I felt weren’t completely well-explained.

But the adorableness of the ending and the soft spot I have in my heart for those who believe – as I do – that books can change lives… that bumped my rating from a 4/5 to a 4.5/5. I think it’s fair to say that this book almost received a 5/5 from me – the only reason that I didn’t rate it that high is because near the end of the book, I felt as though the characters were a bit flat (in some regards – Grace and her hunting rifle excluded!). Additionally, I think that in taking a rather longer-than-intended break from readingThe Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend, I did the book a disservice since it was somewhat difficult to jump back into the story.

Definitely do recommend – definitely will keep this author on my radar!

The Forgotten Room – Lauren Willig, Beatriz Williams, & Karen White

Many thanks to Penguin Group Berkley, NAL/Signet Romance, DAW, via Netgalley, for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

3.5/5 stars.

I was super excited to have been approved to read The Forgotten Roombecause I’ve read books by Lauren Willig and Karen White before, and they were fantastic.

However, although I did enjoy reading The Forgotten Room, it did fall a little flat for me. I loved the idea of three storylines from three very different time periods in history… but I got confused all too easily about which of the women was whom (grandmother, mom, daughter). The relationships were also rather confusing to me, as was the continuation of the same family names throughout the 3 alternating storylines.

I don’t really know why I got so confused reading this book in particular – I think in part it’s due to the fact that the three protagonists are very similar in many ways. Additionally, it was not made clear to the reader what the relationships were between the women until about 75 or 80% through the book (I’m estimating since I did read this awhile ago and don’t exactly remember).

I would recommend it, but hesitantly – not because of shoddy writing or anything like that, but because I simply had difficulty keeping the story straight as well as the point of the book (which still somewhat eludes me, to be honest – it seemed like an awful lot of work to go to, in order to reach the ending that was reached). I would be much more comfortable recommending that people read books by each individual author, especially if you’ve not read books by them before. I am going to be looking up Beatriz Williams, since she’s the only one of the three whom I have not heard of prior to this book.